Bay Area DUI Law Blog

Probation on a DUI

Posted by Amy Morell | Sep 16, 2016 | 0 Comments

What does probation mean?

If you are convicted of a DUI or Wet Reckless, you most likely well be placed on probation. There are two types of probation: Court and Supervised.  Court probation is the most common.  When placed on court probation, you will be ordered to not get arrested, not refuse to take a chemical test if suspected of driving under the influence, not drink and drive and no drive without a valid license and insurance.  These are typical court probation requirements.  There may be additional requirements depending on the jurisdiction.  Typically, court probation is for a period of 3-5 years for DUI cases and 2-3 years for wet reckless cases.

Supervised probation is for multiple DUI offenders or Felony DUIs.  This means you will have a probation officer to report and many requirements.

Vehicle Codes 23538, 23542, 23548 and 23552 discuss conditions imposed for various DUI convictions.

Sentences for driving under the influence

If you have been arrested for DUI, please contact the Morell Law Office at 1-877-366-9440 for a thorough case review at no charge.  We specialize in DUI Defense.

About the Author

Amy Morell

Morell Law Office is 100% devoted to defending people accused of DUI in courts and DMV hearings in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Comments

There are no comments for this post. Be the first and Add your Comment below.

Leave a Comment

Proven Track Record

Slide3

We have a proven track record of successfully helping people charged with DUI throughout the Bay Area.

The information on this California DUI Attorney / Law Firm website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this or associated pages, documents, comments, answers, emails, or other communications should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information on this website is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing of this information does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.

Menu